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Phase 1 of the Trinity Tomorrow building plan is well underway, with construction scheduled to begin early in 2018. This phase includes demolition of the existing Atrium Building and construction of a new Children’s Building in its place.

 

The new Children’s Building will house Trinity Kids Corner but will not be exclusively a TKC building. It is a children’s building with multi-us

rooms where the Junior Daughters of the King, the Junior Brotherhood of St. Andrew, Boy Scouts, TnT, Children’s Chapel, Youth, and other ministries (such as Sunday School) can meet. Our youth will also have dedicated space in the old TKC building, which will be renovated to meet their needs.

Below you’ll find some of the questions that have come up recently and most frequently, along with the answers. Do you have questions that aren’t answered below? Please don’t hesitate to ask them.  Email Fr. Gerry at gsevick@TrinityWoodlands.org, or call him in the office.

 

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

As we get closer to beginning demolition of the Atrium Building and construction of the new Children’s Building, there are many new questions coming up about the revised design plans and how the new space will be used. It is important that these questions are asked and answered as we move forward with the project. The process has been long and complex, and tradeoffs have been necessary along the way. The new building is the Children’s Ministry Building and will house Trinity Kids Corner, but will not be exclusively a TKC building. It is a children’s building with multi-use rooms where the Junior Daughters of the King, the Junior Brotherhood of St. Andrew, Boy Scouts, TnT, Children’s Chapel, Youth, and other ministries (such as Sunday School) can meet. Our Youth will also have dedicated space in the old TKC building, which will be renovated to meet their needs.

Below you’ll find some of the questions that have come up recently and most frequently, along with the answers. Do you have questions that aren’t answered below? Please don’t hesitate to ask them. Email Fr. Gerry at gsevick@TrinityWoodlands.org, or call him in the office.

When we talk about “children” and “youth,” what age groups are we addressing?

For the purposes of all children and youth ministries at Trinity, we put kids in the following groups: children (ages newborn -12), and youth (ages 13-18).

While TKC has its own ministry and programs, it also offers child care for all parish activities when appropriate or requested.

Why is it that a two-story building was $3.5MM and the one-story is $2.9MM? Shouldn’t there be a greater cost savings?

It would seem logical to think that a plan for a building that is 50% smaller than the original would cost 50% less to build, but it really isn’t that simple. This has been a long and complex process with multiple variables having an impact on the construction cost. Below, a few of those are outlined.

The two-story building was over $3.2MM. Again, that does not include any soft costs such as architectural fees, fixtures, and playground equipment, or contingency fees, which drove the price to over $4.2MM. Remember that most of the soft costs remain the same whether one- or two-story design.

We also had to absorb many price increases in building materials. The cost of concrete went up over 20% in one year. Metal studs and drywall costs have increased 39%.

Structural steel increased substantially and continues to increase as steel is not being shipped from Asia and needs to be purchased from US mills. At the same time, the amount of steel required didn’t decrease much from the two-story to one-story design because we removed a lot of the second story flooring and wall steel members but the roof steel remained the same.

The plumbing estimate was only 20% lower for the one-story.

The electrical estimate was 50% lower for the one-story, but that is somewhat misleading as the HVAC design was changed. That was the major reduction.

The two-story pricing did not include a contingency. The one-story pricing did include a 2% contingency. If we used the Diocesan guideline, the contingency would be 10%. However, apples to apples, the contingency adds $67,000 for comparison.

The reduction of the elevator was $68,000.

Who did the committee consult on the needs for the new space? Were ministry leaders consulted? Is the new space much different from what we have now?

Molly Carr and Amanda Boling, along with Father Gerry and other staff and members, were consulted throughout the process and represented the ministries and leaders.

The new Children’s Building is larger, more modern, will be better constructed, and will allow for state licensing for a child care center if we choose to pursue that in the future. It will cost less to maintain and it will bring the children closer to the worship building on Sundays. It will also give all the children’s ministries room to meet and grow.

In the new Children’s Building, TKC uses four rooms, so that leaves the multipurpose room for the children and youth. Will that be enough?

There are five classrooms, one nursery, and one playroom as well as a large multi-purpose room. Children’s ministry and formation activities can be scheduled at times that TKC is not open. Moreover, there is no reason why any of the children and youth cannot use any of those rooms when they are available. We also wanted to offer the youth a space they would make their own, so they will have that in the old TKC building.

Is this cost effective? Almost $300 a square foot sounds too much.

The cost for the demolition and Children’s Building construction is about $2.15 MM. That is about $255 per square foot. Prices of steel and some other materials have had real increases in the past year. We have always estimated $200 – $250 per square foot after interviewing four general contractors. In addition, there are thousands for soft costs and furniture other needs.

The cost of building materials will continue to go up as people rebuild from the hurricanes in Texas, Florida, as well as the rebuilding from the massive wildfires out west.

If a community group like AA meets in the multi-purpose building, will the same facility be used for child care?

The odds are that they will not use that space when other children are in there. Other churches have meetings in the same building as the nursery. However, we expect that they will be scheduled in other rooms in other buildings.

Will TKC and the nursery have easy access to the new playground?

Not right away, but it is temporary. There are plans for a playground next to the children’s building. Until then, the walk is not that long.

Will it have a kitchen?

They do not plan to prepare food, so there is no need for a kitchen.

Why do we need to add TKC to the existing state license? Other churches have a preschool and a daycare on their campus; do they have two licenses?

We have been told by the state that they issue only one license per campus, so we would put TKC and TEDS together for licensing purposes. Betsy and Amanda are on board with this and we are researching the necessary next steps. As we move toward a license we will consult with several other churches in the area.

For example, the Methodist Church has one license for all their ministries. We asked the state licensing representative for The Woodlands.

How much will it cost to renovate the old TKC for the youth?

We expect this to be very little. We will get a bid once we are closer to the renovation, but with the help of volunteers, teens doing some of the painting and decorating the main issues will be carpet and bathrooms. We will consult the youth and the youth leaders on how the remodeling of the space will be done.

How much would it cost to renovate the old TKC building for TKC to stay and be licensed?

It could not be renovated without major rebuild. It is not worth putting that much money into a building we hope to get rid of in the future. In addition, we are not just building for the present TKC needs but the future needs of all our children’s ministries (current and future) and future childcare we and the community will need. TKC is often using space outside of their present building when participation in their programs is very high.

Could the new Children’s Building be used for youth and adult classes rather than TKC?

It would require a whole new design. It was very clear in the survey done 4-5 years ago that the parish wanted our primary focus for Phase One to be on the children. We have proceeded according to the priorities set out by the parish and acted in good faith. Also, it is the Children’s Building, not the TKC building. It is for all our children’s ministries with TKC having its ministry located in it.

It’s a lot of money for a building designated for ages 18 months and younger.

It is not for only that age group. All the children’s ministries of Trinity and all future children’s ministries will be in the Children’s Building.

Has the new TEDS director been asked for feedback on the future facilities plan?

Betsy, Head of School, is aware and on board with the plan. She has been kept up to date on all this.

If there are little people furniture/toys, it wouldn’t be easily turned into adult Sunday school classes on Sunday mornings.

We will have storage and we would not ask you to move the furniture. We still have the three meeting rooms in the Butler Hall building, and the Parlor. Not every room will have little people furniture/toys.